Maximum Weeks of UI Benefits by State

ui-policy-basics-map

8 comments

  • Gunnar Travis

    This map is very outdated – I don’t think very many states still have 26 weeks of UI – for example, NJ cut back to 15 weeks last year and I don’t even know if they have that many today. When do you plan on updating it?

    • NJ has never deviated from paying the maximum of 26 weeks benefits if the base period earnings warrant. If you got a 15-week claim in NJ, then you didn’t work enough to support a better claim.

      NJ will pay anywhere between 1 and 26 weeks – generally 1 week of benefits for each week of wages in the base period, up to a maximum of 26. A “week” in NJ is defined as any week in which you earn at least $168.

      Most states still pay 26 weeks. MT pays 28 weeks. MA pays 30 weeks. Southern coastal states like FL, NC, GA have cut weeks of benefits dramatically down to about 12-14. AR, MO, MI, SC are at 20 weeks. KS at 16. But the rest of the country still pays 26.

  • Christopher Jennings

    I have exhausted my regular U.I. benefits in Nevada, are there any extended benefits i can get? And if so, how do I go about to do it.

  • kevin souza

    i have exhausted my regular U.I. benefits in massachuesetts are there any E. B. or extended benefits i can get.

  • Steph

    If you collect unemployment benefits each week and have a part time job…how do you file for a lay off from the same part time job for 2 weeks. I will be going back in 2 weeks

    • You can’t. Only one claim is allowed per year – that claim already includes ALL employers. Your past part-time earnings are already included in that claim’s base period. The current earnings should have been an offset to your current benefits and reduced the benefit paid each week.

      You continue to file for benefits now. You just don’t report earnings from the part-time job during layoff, so for those two weeks you will receive your full weekly benefit amount.

      Your state may suspend benefits to inquire about why you are no longer reporting earnings while claiming benefits.

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